Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

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Reggie
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Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:02 am

Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Reggie »

Please forgive me for posting here as this is not a Glen-L design and please move this thread to a more appropriate place if needed. I am just conscious of the wealth of information on this forum and the fact that Glen-L builders are familiar with many techniques. I have only built in stitch and glue! So any advice is greatly appreciated...

A friend is restoring this Riva run about. He has taken all the rotten plywood out and also the rotten ribs and replaced them.

He says there was a funny sort of waxy canvas between two layers of plywood (which I believe was planked diagonally at 90 degrees to each other)…

He is asking for some advice on the rebuild …

As it is almost a completer rebuild I am inclined to suggest that he use epoxy and encapsulate all the ribs and “cold mold” all the strips and then sheath the outside at the water line with biaxial…

But I don’t know enough about whether this would be possible/ compatible with what is left or whether he should copy the original system of fasteners, waxy canvas etc…

I don’t think he is looking for it to be restored as original necessarily…

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kens
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Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by kens »

Hi, please start a new thread about your own stitch n glue. We love pictures. What did you build?

On the Riva, he should first decide how he wants to use it.
Does he want to be an exact original boat?
Do you want to show it off at boat shows?
Other people can look at it but don't touch it?
Do you want to give other people boat rides?
Do they have to take off their shoes before getting in?
Are you trying to impress the show judges, or really use it?

Consider that IF the original builders were still around, they would be useing the newest technology available, epoxy techniques, modern engines, modern paint types, modern electronics, newest prop designs.
My opinion is to use modern cold mold technique, encapsulate the new wood, use the boat, enjoy it, give rides, and pull skiers, and kids on tubes.
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)
mickfly
Posts: 310
Joined: Mon Jan 29, 2018 9:19 am

Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by mickfly »

I agree with Ken. The process you choose should reflect the purpose. When I started building, I wanted my Hankinson design to look like a rebuild...a near-perfect replica. I quickly learned that the expense required to do that was higher than I could afford, so I made several concessions and I suppose my boat is a "tribute" to a Chris Craft. Examples are the steering wheel and shift. Finding and buying those parts to match a 1939 build would have cost over $1000. I got both for about $450. They're new and I think they look good, but they are not Chris Craft parts.

I also plan to use my boat, much in the fashion that Ken described...anchoring at the beach, getting back in with sandy feet and pulling muddy anchors aboard...letting my kids water ski or tube behind the boat and using it every chance we get! To that end, I left a few parts (e.g., forward bulkhead) unfinished so I could get to the launch. Six years was enough.

Your rebuild looks like a really cool project and...I can relate to the tight build space! Good luck.

Mike
Completed builds:
Guillemot kayak (16 ft, 2001)
Pygmy Double Kayak (20 ft, 2003)
Skin-on-frame kayak (17 ft, 2011)
Glen-L 15 (15 ft, 2008)
Glen-L Key Largo, Hankinson Design (20 ft, 2021)
denbrlr
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Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by denbrlr »

My two cents...definitely encapsulate, cold mold, fiberglass, etc. using modern marine grade materials. If you do, the boat will last a long time :)

Lee
YouTube channel: Boat Builder Lee
Monaco build YouTube playlist: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCP4Edb ... /playlists
Reggie
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Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:02 am

Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Reggie »

Thanks for the replies … so my two stitch and glue boats … an 18 foot dory and a center console are from a different designer … so I thought it might be inappropriate to post here.

Having said that I was given plans for the Glen L console skiff and I love the lines … so that may be in my future.

Coming back to the Riva … using the boat is definitely the intention… not restoration accolades by a bunch of purists at some annual and obscure gathering…

My question was more about how best to do the modern methods?

If one was using epoxy, fillets and glass sheathing at the waterline is there still a need for fasteners … for example.

Should one sheath the outside and inside?

Epoxy coat only?

How will this interact with the parts of the boat that are in a more “natural way” still?

That was sort of what I wanted to discuss…
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Jimbob
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Location: Sacramento, CA

Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Jimbob »

In looking at the pictures, it looks like all framing has been replaced. They are notched for the battens. At this point, I would treat the boat as a new construction and use modern methods. (epoxy & fiberglass). The construction would be the same as with glen l designs using cold molding. The battens should be epoxied into the notches and screwed into the frames with silicon bronze screws. Once the battens are in place, some fairing is in order. Encapsulate everything before proceeding. Use CPS on any old wood. I used 4mm joubert okoume marine plywood. Epoxy layers of the plywood in a diagonal pattern. My boat called for screws along the chine and keel for reinforcement once the plywood was in place. Lots of examples on the forum.
I spoke to a local boat restorer today that specializes in Riva boats. He said modern methods would be fine, you just don't want to mix old and new. Since everything is new, I think you are good to go.
Hope this helps.
Jim
Jim Neeley
Building a Barrelback in Sacramento, CA
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Alan71
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Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Alan71 »

Hello Reggie,

"He says there was a funny sort of waxy canvas between two layers of plywood (which I believe was planked diagonally at 90 degrees to each other)…"

Perhaps what your friend was/is seeing is a layer of canvas or muslin. On many ChrisCraft, Hacker, GarWood and other boats of that era, that layer was placed between the layers of mahogany planking and saturated with boatyard bedding compound based on linseed oil.

It's likely not something he'd want to duplicate in his restoration.

Regards,
Alan
Last edited by Alan71 on Sat Jan 29, 2022 6:32 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Mr Hot Rod
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Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Mr Hot Rod »

Reggie wrote: My question was more about how best to do the modern methods?
If one was using epoxy, fillets and glass sheathing at the waterline is there still a need for fasteners … for example.
Should one sheath the outside and inside?
Epoxy coat only?
How will this interact with the parts of the boat that are in a more “natural way” still?
That was sort of what I wanted to discuss…
Welcome to the Forum ! You'll find more info here : Don't forget to check out Glen-L's Home Page and Books, DVD's & Audio.

I'm sure cold-molded builders will chime in soon ...

Enjoy your project !

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Kane Custom Boats Ltd.
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kens
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Location: Coastal Georgia

Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by kens »

Reggie wrote: Fri Jan 28, 2022 1:53 pm Thanks for the replies … so my two stitch and glue boats … an 18 foot dory and a center console are from a different designer … so I thought it might be inappropriate to post here.

Having said that I was given plans for the Glen L console skiff and I love the lines … so that may be in my future.

Coming back to the Riva … using the boat is definitely the intention… not restoration accolades by a bunch of purists at some annual and obscure gathering…

My question was more about how best to do the modern methods?

If one was using epoxy, fillets and glass sheathing at the waterline is there still a need for fasteners … for example.

Should one sheath the outside and inside?

Epoxy coat only?

How will this interact with the parts of the boat that are in a more “natural way” still?

That was sort of what I wanted to discuss…
In the modern methods, that layer of waxy gunk between would now be a epoxy resin glue bonding the layers.
On the outside I would definitely epoxy 1 thin layer of glass cloth. Glass cloth if purchased correctly, applied correctly, will go clear at under 6oz/yard.
On my canoe build, I used a thinner 4oz cloth S-glass and I really like it.
Just cloth the outside. Inside is encapsulate only.
Since a good epoxy bond is stronger than the wood itself, it doesn't really matter if you leave fastners in nor take them out.
I use a lot of wire brads (brad nail gun) to hold parts together while the epoxy cures, then the brads are nearly invisible. Stainless brads can be left in, and the plastic RAPTOR brads are left in.
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)
Reggie
Posts: 15
Joined: Sun Dec 03, 2017 8:02 am

Re: Rebuilding a Riva from the 1960's

Post by Reggie »

Thank you all for the insights. Most useful.
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