Building The Vera Cruise

Designs for inboard or outboard power

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Here's some examples I found using the search tem "sash style" . These all have the advantage of probably not requiring any additional wood added to the inside of the window landings. The locking part could be attached to the landing and the hook can be attached to the inside of the window frame. All that would be needed is to remove sufficient landing material to allow the hook to protrude into the cabin. These are just examples, but they illustrate the types of latch mechanisms that might work. I'll keep looking for more ideas.

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Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise
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sshamilt@gmail.com
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

The first and third in your pictures have a tendency to pull the gap between the sashes together, closing any gaps, I think. The middle one is more passive and simply holds the dash shut. 1 and 3 think sliding windows. 2 think swinging window
Steve

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Good points Steve. Thanks for pointing that out. Something else to keep in mind.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise
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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

This style looks to press the window against the landing. Another this ing to watch for. You can see that this would not pull the window against the landing when closed.

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Carl

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

It occurs to me that the handle could be mounted on the window frame to get the "pulling effect".

I was looking at this one when that thought occurred to me.

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Carl

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by sshamilt@gmail.com »

On a window that swings out, the latch is used as the handle to pull the window shut so that would make sense in your case also
Steve

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

sshamilt@gmail.com wrote: Fri Nov 26, 2021 7:40 am On a window that swings out, the latch is used as the handle to pull the window shut so that would make sense in your case also
Yes, I agree. Looking at the forward cabin windows from inside the boat, this would almost be a necessity because of the angle of the windows would make a handle below the window awkward to use.


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Carl

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kens
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by kens »

Just thinking out loud here, but the old tymers sailing vessels used a wedge to close a porthole or portlight. They had a splashwell at the portlight to keep out splash and the wedge held window either open or closed. You dont need splashwell on something stylish like yours, but, What if you mounted a grab bar, towel bar, or such feature, positioned just right such a wedge would jam the window shut.?
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Ken,

Thanks for the response. I had to think a bit what you were describing, but I think I understand. The wedge would be between the inside of the cabin and the inside of the handle.

The main problem with the way I made these windows assemblies (lack of experience n my part) is that the window frame and the landings are the same height and there is no extra wood above the window frames to attach a handle to. The only place for a handle mounting is on the frames themselves, which lay against the landings. So any part the hardware attached to the frames will have to have a corresponding section cut out of the landing in order to allow the windows to fully close.

I think small cut outs in the landings will be fine, and not affect the integrity of the landings too much. There might be a possible leakage risk there. But a wider handle would require a wider cutout unless the handle also hinged upwards while the window is being closed.

Still an interesting idea though. I like this sort of brainstorming as it brings things more into focus.
Carl

Crafting a classically styled Vera Cruise
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Still doing research. I found some nice looking latches but they are $21.00 each and I would need 12. Yikes. But even worse, I was looking for window stays to match and I found one style I like, but these average $40.00 to $60.00 each. And again I would need 12. So for 6 windows this would run me close to $1000.00 . Double and triple yikes. Not sure why this stuff has to cost so much.

The latches would probably be doable although I wouldn't be happy about the cost. The stays would be nice but I could probably do without for now and get them later. I'm also considering wood substitutes for both. That would have the benefit of costing nothing, but making 12 of each would be a PITA. And I would probably still have to spend money on some sort of hinge arrangement for the stays.


These are the ones I am considering.

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Carl

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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by chugalug »

:D I've got 3 (should have 4) of these setups out of older window van.Just send a pm with address-I'll send to you.I was going to use on chug but couldn't figure out how.Now the little round thing goes in round hole in plexi or whatever.
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Working on regular-sized Bo-Jest


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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Thanks for the offer Tim. I've decided to buy the latches I have pictured for now and wait on the window stays until next year. The latches I have to get to keep the windows closed. The window stays can wait.
Carl

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mrintense
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by mrintense »

Many ,many different small (and some larger) projects going on at the same time. Almost all of them are waiting on something in order to move forward. The trailer needs to go through a complicated process to get a bonded title since it was purchased from out of state and the original owner wasn't required to title it. I have all the necessary paperwork, included the Manufacturers Certificate of Origin, but Texas is rather obstinate about trailer titling. First step in this process is getting the sheriff's department to do an inspection. They only do these between 1 and 3 PM on Wednesdays, , no appointments are made (which means a potential wait when I get there). So trailer process is on hold for that.

Windows are moving forward a bit. I have them assembled and am planning on sealing them this weekend. I've been working on latching arrangements and waiting for some parts which should be here tomorrow or Monday.

I smooth sanded the wood on the transom and then applied some varnish. Then smooth sanded it again and started to apply a new can of the same varnish. Unfortunately, this can was a bad batch and didn't cover well. So it's coming off. I got a refund on that can and ordered another which should be here Thursday. I've been really happy with this product so far, so this was a glitch, that was unexpected. So transom is on hold as well.

And the white elephant in the room. Buffing and polishing the paint on the boat. The two part poly has cured now for a month. I took one of the interior panels to practice techniques on. I started by wet sanding with 1000 grit sandpaper, which smoothed it out nicely. Then I tried buffing with various grades of buffing compound, using a newly purchased DA polisher. Although this did gloss up the surface some, it still has a dull look to it.

So I am pondering what to do next. I've heard that Ceramic coatings do a great job of sealing and glossing over poly paint, but they are very expensive and I am reluctant to purchase some just yet on the chance that it will not fix the finish on the test panel.

I've heard that paste waxes and wipe on wax finishes will also do a good job, but they are not as durable.

I am not going to try tackling the boat until I know I have something that will work. I am looking for ideas here. So anything anybody can recommend, please post it here.

Options I am considering:

1. Paste wax
2. Wipe on liquid wax product
3. Ceramic coating - Expensive
4. Overcoat with clearcoat - Very Expensive
5. Wipe on Polyurethane - durability experience on his has been mixed
Carl

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kens
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by kens »

Polishing paint to get that wet look is hard, and time consuming. Almost like doing paintjob all over again.
You may need to try different kinds of polishing compound. Different kinds of bonnets. Different grits, and so on.
Wool bonnet, cotton bonnet, foam bonnet.
Different buffer speeds, different hand pressure.
Then you got to get out the swirls and the process starts over.
There is million different kinds of rubbing compound, buffing compound, polishing compound, swirl removers, etc., etc.
Those compounds overlap the finer sanding grits. Once you get near 1500 grit, it is possible the compound is actually coarser than your last sanding trip.
This is all trial and error on your particular paint brand.
No way does a certain compound label xyz work for everybody's paint job.
You just got to try it and see. (and buy 3 or 4 bottles of compound & 2 or 3 bonnets you don't like)
Oak..........the juice ain't worth the squeeze :D :shock: :o :)
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Jimbob
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Re: Building The Vera Cruise

Post by Jimbob »

Hi Carl,
Here's my take on polishing.
It sounds like you stopped sanding too soon. (you missed a lot of fun. ha ha) You should be going beyond 1000 grit.
I start at 400 grit and work up to 2000 grit in increments of 200. ex. 400,600,800,1000, 1200, ... I found that dry sanding worked better for me, as I could monitor the process better. After I finished sanding, I used two polishing compounds, one to cut and the other to polish. (pic below) After all of that I used Meguiar's Cleaner Wax for the final touch. I also got rid of the pad that came with the polishing machine. I replaced with a hook and loop system and hexlogic pads from Chemical Guys. (you can google them).
Try sanding to 2000 grit and I'll bet it will work for you. Chemical Guys have pretty good how to videos on their website. I have used this process for polishing many surfaces including stainless steel.
Jim
Attachments
Notice the hook and loop pads.  Different pads for cutting and polishing.  Pic of rubbing compounds.
Notice the hook and loop pads. Different pads for cutting and polishing. Pic of rubbing compounds.
Jim Neeley
Building a Barrelback in Sacramento, CA
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