Canoe Painting Questions

Painting options, interior and exterior.

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csuh13
Posts: 18
Joined: Fri Jul 08, 2005 1:29 pm
Location: SF Bay Area

Canoe Painting Questions

Post by csuh13 »

Hello,

I'm building a Pirogue canoe, and I'm planning on painting the exterior with a high quality exterior house latex paint (weatherbeater ultra,) which will be red (due to a special request from my daughter...)

But what should I use on the interior? I don't think red would be right... Any color/material suggestions?

Thanks!

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

white or light gray.Light colors won't be as hot on bare feet& light gray won't show dirt or have as much glare in the sun.

Smith Brother
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Location: INDY,IN USA

Post by Smith Brother »

I haven't followed the CANOE building tips, etc, but was surprised to read that you are using HOUSE PAINT for the exterior of your canoe. I assume your canoe won't be in the water for long period of time, so to speak, but would love to hear why you chose HOUSE PAINT. Nothing personal, just would like to learn more about different paints on different boats.

Dale in Indy
I AM ALWAYS DOING THAT WHICH I CANNOT DO, IN ORDER TO LEARN HOW TO DO IT. ~ Pablo Picasso 1881 - 1973

FDMSIV
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Post by FDMSIV »

Smith Brother,
In the older web news letters that Glen-L sends out there is an article devoted to painting boats with exterior latex. I have been looking at it again and again trying to decide if I should give it a shot. It is a very good article, the author makes some very compelling points, but so do "for" articles.

csuh13
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Location: SF Bay Area

Post by csuh13 »

Well, house paint is cheap, durable and mildew resistant. Especially a high end one with polyurethane additives.

You can get a gallon for $10-$15 on sale.

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razopp
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Post by razopp »

I too am considering using house paint for my Minuet build. Below is a post from the Wooden Boat Forum (around 2000) regarding using 100% Acryllic Latex House Paint. I think Dave Carnell is a pretty reputable source. He has posted on the Duckworks site several times with articles about painting.


Posted by Dave Carnell (Member # 1696) on 12-15-2000, 04:43 PM:
WARNING: Warning this article contains material that may be offensive if you think painting is more fun
than boating.
When I bought my first yacht (27’ auxiliary sloop) for $300 in 1951 I quickly learned that if its for a
boat,the same material costs several times as much as if it is for your house. Oakum was $1/lb. at the
marine supply store;five pounds for a dollar at the plumbing supply store. Marine paint cost several
times as much as house paint of
similar composition. I worked for a major chemical company that also made paint and knew that their
paint that made the most money and on which they spent the most on research was house paint.
Houses are out in the weather all year-no winter cover or inside storage. Their owners expect to repaint
them infrequently, such as every ten years or so. They also expect a good paint job will require little
preparation before repainting. Back then the only house
paints were oil paints, so my yacht was painted with top quality oil-based house paint.
All paints consist of binders or resins, pigments, solvents, and additives. The binder forms the film
thatsticks to the boat and holds the pigment there. The pigments color the paint, make it opaque and
have a good deal to do with UV resistance. Solvents keep the binder dispersed or dissolved and the
pigments dispersed in an easy to
apply state. They allow the paint to be applied in the correct thickness and then evaporate from the
paint film as it
dries. Mineral spirits, a petroleum distillate fraction, is the most common solvent in oil-based paints. In
latex paints, water is the major fluid. It does not dissolve the latex particles, but disperses them in
suspension. Small amounts of special solvents are present to control the coalescence of the latex
particles into a tough, tenacious film and to slow down the drying of the latex paint.
Through the years latex paints have developed to the point where 100% acrylic latex paints are better
than oil paints on all counts. They are more durable and tougher. They resist chalking and fading,
retaining their color especially well when exposed to bright sun. They are easier to apply, going on
more smoothly and with less brush drag. They have less tendency to grow mildew. They have almost
no odor and no fire hazard. Cleanup is with water. They can be recoated in as little as one hour.
The 100% acrylic latex is the key to the outstanding latex primers and paints now available. The
weather resistance of these polymers parallels that of the acrylic molding powders that make red
automobile taillight and stoplight lenses that last forever without fading. I checked out all the top
quality exterior primers, paints, and porch and deck paints at both Lowe’s and Home Depot-they are all
100% acrylic latex products. All of the products are available as custom colors mixed to your desire.
Paint (Dave Carnell on Latex Paint) Repost - The WoodenBoat Forum Page 2 of 10
http://www.woodenboat-ubb.com/vbulletin ... irby+Paint 4/19/2006
A posting on the rec.boats.building newsgroup on the Internet asked if latex paint was good below the
waterline, as if it was going to wash off. Look around your neighborhood. All those houses painted with
latex paint
sit out in the weather all the time. My boats live in the water with their latex paint jobs. Platt Monfort
recommends
for waterproofing the Dacron® skins of his Geodesic Airolite boats “...the simplest method being a good
quality exterior latex house paint.”
How long is the latex paint job going to last? The 16-year old Uncle Gabe’s Flattie Skiff (Sam Rabl)
built of ¼” fir plywood was painted when new and then about 9 years ago. It looks pretty scroungy, but
the interesting thing is that while the paint on the wood has
been scoured off by hurricane winds and general wear the paint on the epoxy-fiberglass joints in the
sides is perfectly intact and looks great.
When I rebuilt my 1964 Simmons Sea-Skiff 20 I used a heat gun and a wide chisel to remove about a
dozen layers of old oil paint. To repaint I used latex primer and then two coats of Lowe’s “Severe
Weather” 15-year
guarantee semigloss latex exterior paint custom colored to match the “Simmons blue” that was next to
the wood. It has been three years and three hurricanes ridden out on the mooring since the boat was
launched. Except where the boat has rubbed fenders or the edge of the float and on the cockpit
floorboards the paint is in first class shape. I do
need to repaint the floorboards. In my survey I found that Lowe’s has an exterior 100% acrylic latex
skid resistant paint (Skid-Not®) that can be custom colored. I believe I will try it.
I am not alone in appreciating the outstanding performance of 100% acrylic latex paints for boats.
Thomas Firth Jones, boat designer, boatbuilder, and author of Boats To Go wrote in Boatbuilder several
years ago that he preferred latex paint over oil paint for boats for all of the reasons cited above. He
did comment that he paints his tiller with oil-based paint because the latex paint stains there.
I was talking with “Dynamite” Payson one May weekend a couple of years ago and he told me he was
going to repaint his skiff with latex paint that weekend.
Jim Michalak, boat designer and builder, uses latex paint on his boats.
Phil Bolger reported in Messing About in BOATS that his personal outboard boat is painted with
semigloss
latex house paint.
Boatbuilders are traditionalists and it has been a hard sell to get them to accept plywood, stitch-andglue
construction, epoxy adhesives, and other similar innovations. Don’t let tradition keep you from
benefitting from the ease of application and outstanding performance of 100% acrylic latex paints.
[This message has been edited by Dave Carnell (edited 12-15-2000).]


I hope this helps add a little "color" to your decision.

Robert

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leakcheck
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Post by leakcheck »

They talk alot about the Acrylic latex paints but arent the enamels even more tough ??

Steve

Smith Brother
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Location: INDY,IN USA

Post by Smith Brother »

I will try a test on some tomorrow and CLEAR COAT to see if such will give to me the SMOOTH AND SHINE I WANT. I will use as my CLEAR COAT, WATER BASED POLY.


I can see latex for applications where a automotive finish isn't desired, but in my case I want that SMOOTH SHINE.

COMMENTS?


Dale in Indy
I AM ALWAYS DOING THAT WHICH I CANNOT DO, IN ORDER TO LEARN HOW TO DO IT. ~ Pablo Picasso 1881 - 1973

FDMSIV
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Joined: Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:28 pm
Location: New Orleans

Post by FDMSIV »

I was thinking about using a flat paint, and then cover it with a glossy clear coat. I think the clear coat will stick to the flat paint better. Just a thought

garrech
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Location: South Carolina

Re: Canoe Painting Questions

Post by garrech »

FDMSIV wrote:I was thinking about using a flat paint, and then cover it with a glossy clear coat. I think the clear coat will stick to the flat paint better. Just a thought
csuh13 wrote:Hello,

I'm building a Pirogue canoe, and I'm planning on painting the exterior with a high quality exterior house latex paint (weatherbeater ultra,) which will be red (due to a special request from my daughter...)

But what should I use on the interior? I don't think red would be right... Any color/material suggestions?

Thanks!

csuh13 & FDMSIV,
How did that work out for you? I'm approaching the finishing/painting stage of our Kidyak. After reading this post I'm leaning towards the 100% acrylic latex paint. I also think I'll put on a clear coat. What did you use for that?

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