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 Post subject: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 8:23 am 
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Location: Coastal Georgia
Please tell me your pros & cons of wood rub rails.
Take wood rub rail stock and encapsulate the outer edges in Dynel. No paint, just fill the weave with aluminum powder epoxy for a silver color finish and leave it at that.
Pros & Cons :?:

I already have the black bottom coat with white topsides, how would the silver look :?:

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 7:48 pm 
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Joined: Wed Dec 13, 2006 11:42 pm
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Location: Apple Valley, MN (Mpls.) Sea Knight/Malahini
kens wrote:
Please tell me your pros & cons of wood rub rails.
Take wood rub rail stock and encapsulate the outer edges in Dynel. No paint, just fill the weave with aluminum powder epoxy for a silver color finish and leave it at that.
Pros & Cons :?:

I already have the black bottom coat with white topsides, how would the silver look :?:

I have wood rub rails on mine but just stained and varnished, no Dynel. They look nice but so far the lock walls have won each time they battle with the rub rail.


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sat Sep 04, 2010 10:48 pm 
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Location: Marissa, IL
I have a friend building a Coastal Cruiser and has used TREX for the rubrail. I haven't tried it myself and his boat has not yet launched but seems like it might be a interesting material for the purpose. No finish required and if screwed on could easily be replaceable if damaged. Compared to commercial rubrail it is very reasonably priced yet should handle scrapes better than solid wood (yea, locks are brutal). It is used for decks and deck trim and is available at either Lowes or Home Depot in different colors and sizes. He used the silver color and by the photo below you can get an idea of how it looks.

TREX- http://www.trex.com/why-trex/


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 5:01 am 
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Location: North Carolina
Sorry this post may give some splinters to some of the knickers of some other builders. But a wooden boat does not need to have plastic anyway close to their rails unless the boat is a throwaway boat. Add a super good hardwood and then at minimum invest in a metal rail even if you use the hollow back bedded properly with good bedding compound. That is one area that should not be short changed for any boat that you think that needs a rail. Plastic cheapens any boat and cheapens all the other work. If you do not add metal, add a good sacrifical piece of teak or even white oak. Plastic rubrails especially the L shaped stuff will hold water as it moves with the sun beating down on the stuff. Heck some of the plastic stuff cost more than the hollowback metal railing. I back fill with thickened epoxy to make solid stock as saves hundreds of dollars from the half oval stuff.


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 5:21 am 
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Joined: Thu May 18, 2006 5:19 am
Posts: 1522
Location: AL
I used white oak for rub rails. I figure when they get damage, I will replace them. Thats what they are there for!


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 5:28 am 
I was looking at that stuff the other day,but was thinking of using it for trailer bunks after psychobilly mentioned some commercially made ones for trailers.Anyone have any experience with that stuff?

I agree with Oyster on the use for a nice wood boat,however it would be practical I suppose if not ascetically as nice a proper rail


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:30 pm 
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Location: Marissa, IL
Oyster, I understand where you are coming from BUT do you use locks on a regular basis? I do and in my opinion using solid wood is a mistake unless you love constantly repairing or replacing them. Even using fenders there are many times the pressure of the flooding chambers force the hull against the very rough concrete wall. Not only is the boat dancing around but the wall is moving downward. Kind of like a huge slow moving belt sander using sharp pea gravel as the abrasive. Even metal inserts are scratched badly and can develop burrs that will slice a finger open. Plastic is the ONLY thing I will use as rubrails. They take the abuse and require little if any maintenance. But I will admit if I didn't run through locks I might look at this differently.

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 7:42 pm 
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Location: North Carolina
raymacke wrote:
Oyster, I understand where you are coming from BUT do you use locks on a regular basis? I do and in my opinion using solid wood is a mistake unless you love constantly repairing or replacing them. Even using fenders there are many times the pressure of the flooding chambers force the hull against the very rough concrete wall. Not only is the boat dancing around but the wall is moving downward. Kind of like a huge slow moving belt sander using sharp pea gravel as the abrasive. Even metal inserts are scratched badly and can develop burrs that will slice a finger open. Plastic is the ONLY thing I will use as rubrails. They take the abuse and require little if any maintenance. But I will admit if I didn't run through locks I might look at this differently.


Oh I understand where you are coming from. I should have been more clear in regards to my reply. The thread was created by Kens and I was attempting to speak to Kens. He also spoke about using Dynel which IMHO is of little value. I personally do not subscribe to glassing rails at all, not even rowing type boats, too much work for what you gain, if any, .02 worth anyway..

But along those lines, the L shaped rubrail which I spoke about thats installed on most production boats has the potential to be ripped off and for sure has very little cushion in the lock scenerio too.

My experience with locking has also included sacrifical burlap bagged haybales too and fender boards and would never depend or use any type of solid rail which will never act as a shock obsorber. I have rarely even used the inflatable ones since the sides are indeed harsh to the nice rubberized ones.


On a wooden boat especially, this is truely very important no matter the rails especially when larger boats are in play. Sorry if I seemed too harsh.


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Sun Sep 05, 2010 8:34 pm 
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Location: Marissa, IL
Harsh? Not at all. Just different point of view. That is what makes these discussions so helpful.

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 11:42 am 
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Location: Lander Wyoming
i love how all the members on this board are able to kiss and make up! That is the only reason I even
bother to get into arguments with Bill Edmunson!! :roll: :wink: :!: :mrgreen:


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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 2:59 pm 
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Location: Coastal Georgia
Another concern I have with rub rails is fishing.......I am often hauling the anchor rode over the forward gunnel. This is gonna tear up my topsides and that part of the deck. A generous rubrail can protect a lot of the topsides. I been toying with some idea of a anchor pulpit on the forward gunnel.
Anybody got good ideas? :?:

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 6:37 pm 
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Location: Birmingham, AL, USA
Leakcheck

Ahhh :!: you big lug! :roll:

Bill

As with most boating things. A lot depends on what you need and where you use the boat.

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 7:10 pm 
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Location: Marissa, IL
Quote:
As with most boating things. A lot depends on what you need and where you use the boat.

Bill nailed it! Even though Oyster and my answers are very different they are both present valid positions. His answer works well for him but I use (and abuse) my boat differently and as a result need a different solution. If I have learned anything by building boats it is there is seldom only a single answer to a construction problem. I think that is why most of us visit this forum. We can get varying opinions of how to handle a problem and then pick the one that works the best in our situation. Hate to think of all the screw-ups I would have made without the help found here!

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 Post subject: Re: Wood Rub Rails
PostPosted: Tue Sep 07, 2010 11:13 pm 
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Location: Cullman AL
My opinion on Wood. NEVER encapsulate it! No plastic films either. You'll just have wet wood that will rot.

Rub rails are better made of hardwood. Replaceable on a pretty quick basis.
So don't make your rub rails with any exotic planing, shaping etc. Buy a good piece of 1X4 Oak, etc, sand stain or primer and put er on.

In AK we used Hardwood strips for making the Rub Rails when hauling Crab pots.
Just make it easily replaceable, but it's gotta be hard stuff.
White Oak is just fine. Cheap, plentiful and comes in lots of sizes.

Something like Cedar is nearly a life time thing, but it splinters easily. Always catching your fish line etc.


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