Questions about...everything

Canoes, Kayaks, Pedal power

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tmstacrs
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Questions about...everything

Post by tmstacrs »

So basically I am completely new to boat building and coincidentally this website. I would like to build the 17' Whitehall rowboat but need guidance.

Firstly, would 300+lbs. be intimidating/unreasonable for one man to row?
Also could an outboard be attached to this?

I have my heart set on the Dulce boat (http://www.glen-l.com/designs/canu-row/dsn-whle.html) and would like to recreate it. I assume it is fiberglass but i was thrown off by some of the wood like the rear (transom?) for example. Any advise on how to achieve this look would be greatly appreciated.

On the catalog page ( http://www.boatdesigns.com/products.asp?dept=190 ) i can not determine if the Fiberglass kit contains all of the materials i would need to construct it. ( would i need and wood components or is the fiberglass boat solely fiberglass)

Would you recommend any other things to purchase. I'm probably going to get the how to fiberglass a boat book.

Thanks in advance

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Dave Grason
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Post by Dave Grason »

WOW, you really ARE new to this. Well, don't feel bad cause we all have been there and you have arrived at the right place.

The fiberglass materials you're refering to involve the epoxy and fiberglass cloth required to protect your WOOD boat. This method of boatbuilding means you'll construct the boat from wood and then encapsulate everything in epoxy. In areas where the boat is expected to get a lot of bumps and abrasion, you can put in a layer of fiberglass cloth called "deck" cloth. It's usually about 4-6oz in weight and when you "wet" it out with the epoxy, it virtually disappears allowing the wood to show through. In other areas where you might want to paint your boat, you can go with even heavier cloth for even more protection.

So now you have the best of both worlds. You have a boat with all the beauty, charm and mystic of wood and the wearability of fiberglass.

One final thing. If you already knew this, please forgive my assumption that you didn't.

In addition to the "How to Fiberglass Boats," spring for the "Boatbuilding in Plywood" as well. It will be money well spent, trust me.
Isn't it amazing!! The person that never has the fortitude to pursue his own dreams, will be the first to try and discourage you from pursuing yours.

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BruceDow
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Post by BruceDow »

Tmstacrs:

That is a beautiful rowboat. I have been seriously thinking about it as my next build.

If you look at these pictures, you can see how Barry is "strip-building" the hull in wood.


http://www.glen-l.com/designs/canu-row/dsn-whlf.html

This wooden hull will be sanded and fiberglassed. Then it will pop off of the forms, and hold its shape.

The fiberglass can either be left clear so show the wood (like on the back of the boat in your link), or painted (like the sides of the boat in your link)

This building technique is commonly used to build canoes, and there is lots of information on this technique on the internet. (Search on "stripper canoe"). A great book on this topic is "Canoecraft" by Ted Moores.

You need to purchase your own wood PLUS the fiberglass kit. I hope you will buy your fiberglass kit from Glen-L. There are many companies that can supply you with the pre-cut cedar strips for forming your hull.

Good Luck!
Bruce.

~~ Do what you love, and love what you do. ~~
~~ To me - only my boat is not yet perfect. Everybody else's is to be admired for I know the path they have walked (Dave Lott, 2010) ~~
Dow's Monaco Project

tmstacrs
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Post by tmstacrs »

Hello again,
I apologize for the length since i first posted but the vacation and family invasion distracted me from my intrigue.
Anyway thank you both soooooo very much! I think i understand the basics, however i am still slightly frightened
by the size of it both for building and rowing (but more so for rowing.) I understand that this is in the human
powered section but how would u provide locomotion or am i overreacting about its weight.

Again thank you for the answers and I'm very exited; been waiting to push the finish order button for a while
and it shouldn't be long until i get the courage.

upspirate

Post by upspirate »

I wouldn't be intimidated by the size or weight.This hull is designed to slip through the water with little resistance.The extra weight will help you maintain your speed when you encounter waves.

tmstacrs
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Post by tmstacrs »

I apologize for all of the questions but after looking at the description some more I saw that it was c-flex one off fiberglass which from the glen-l website->boat building methods-> one off fiberglassing and then clicking on Feather is seems that they simply build supports and put fiberglass planking on. I was wondering if that was what the kit and fiberglass plans were for instead of the wood stitch and glue you talked about and then fiberglassing over.
If it is only fiberglass and no wood then do you suggest buying the wood boat plans and then adventure on my own to add the fiberglass cloth without the kit.
<Because if I don't...who will?>

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leakcheck
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Post by leakcheck »

Do you plan on building a wooden boat ? Or a fiberglass boat ?

The C-Flex is fiberglass, and I do not think that is what you are looking for.

The DULCE is strip plank built (Look at the customer photos section, or the photographs at the bottom of the boat design page of the Whitehall andyou will see the process quite clearly)..that is a great way to build a boat, you can glass it when the wooden part is completed.

Steve

stumpy
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Post by stumpy »

The choice is yours, whether you choose wood or fiberglasss as a planking material. C-flex is a fiberglass planking material , and will yield a fiberglass boat with all the assets and pitfalls of the material. I believe the wood strip version might end up lighter in weight, stronger hull, and, if fully encapsulated inside and out with fiberglass and epoxy, should outlast the fiberglass version, aside from looking better. I'd paint the ouside, but leave the inside clear.
Rowing a 300+# boat shouldn't be a problem for one, easier for two, but that weight will be an asset once under way, adding stability and momentum. Aside from that it's an absolutly beautiful boat that's sure to turn heads.

tmstacrs
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Post by tmstacrs »

Okay, my worries have been alleviated and I have begun construction! Thanks to you guys,

I've purchased the wood plans and will, if all goes according to plan, encapsulate it. But the answers of my instructions beget more questions, firstly the instructions say that you should secure the frame by drilling holes and using expansion bolts in concrete. Problem is that while I am doing this in the garage, drilling holes in the floor won't be permitted. So does anybody have suggestions for alternative means of anchoring?

Secondly, how precise do the station forms need to be?
I have fabricated the about 6 of them and see some small bumps or imperfections from where i cut. How detrimental is this and should i begin again cutting slightly over sized or will the natural bend in the planking be enough to negate this.

Sorry for all the questions but I have a feeling that as i go there will be many many more. :roll:
<Because if I don't...who will?>

tmstacrs
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Joined: Tue Dec 18, 2007 7:02 pm

Post by tmstacrs »

Ahh, yet another query. For choosing an epoxy mainly for the strip planking would you suggest Epoxy shield or epoxy grip. Thanks
<Because if I don't...who will?>

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